Author Archives: Towe

Daylesford Farmshop & Café – An organic piece of heaven

A couple of weeks ago, the Danish journalist Hanne Høiberg visited Daylesford Farmshop & Café in London. Here’s her review.

“- Want to try a piece of brie with truffle, we just made it?

The waiter behind the bar must be a mind reader. I was just thinking, full of a fantastic pumpkin risotto and a glass of the house wine from their vineyard in Provence, that I might want a little piece of cheese to go down with the rest of the wine. So of course I say yes and complete the meal with a perfect little piece of mature soft brie, together with some mascarpone and truffle oil – on the house.

The staff here at Daylesford Farmshop & Café in Notting Hill is without a doubt passionate about their work and want to share their passion with a Danish journalist doing a research trip. Not that I told them I wanted to write about it. In their eyes I’m just one of all the tourists coming through, who looks like they’re enjoying the food and the beautiful surroundings. And they are perfectly right.

It was a total coincidence that I wandered into this hidden pearl on cosy Westbourne Growe – a vegetable shop, bakery, butcher, cheese store and café, all in one. And everything is organic! Actually, I originally just popped in for a quick cappuccino, the best I’ve ever had in London and enjoyed the sight of the bulging cabbages, crispy carrots, homemade raspberry vodka and yellow cheddar on display in the light rooms decorated in with a Nordic design, while feeling the delightful smell of newly baked bread. After that experience, I just had to come back for breakfast.

Almost everything in both the shop and the café comes from Dayleford’s organic farm in Gloustershire. Not only the beef, chicken, fruits and vegetables are made here, but also the milk, yogurt and cheese, because Daylesford also has their own creamery. And the few ingredients that are not produced at Daylesford, are all from farms living by the same philosophy of organic foods and sustainability.

The Daylesford products have won more than 80 national and international gastronomic prizes. So if you value good fresh food in a beautiful environment, Daylesford Farmshop & Café is a must, when you are in London. “

Daylesford Farmshop & Café in Notting Hill is open Monday to Saturday 8.30am – 7pm and Sunday 10am – 4pm. Get directions in our Britain Map or visit their website www.daylesfordorganic.com for further information about their farm or other shops.

Enjoy!

/Towe

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Titanic: The Artefact Exhibition

The “unsinkable ship” Titanic set off on her maiden voyage on 10th of April 1912. She was supposed to sail from Southampton, England to New York, USA on a four day crossing, but collided with an iceberg on the 14th of April and sank with only 706 people surviving in the freezing water.

Now, almost 100 years later, the largest exhibition of Titanic artefacts are shown at the O2 in London. View over 300 artefacts from the ship, recreated first and third-class cabins, exclusive footage from the 2010 expedition to rescue artefacts from the wreck and much more.

The exhibition at the O2 is open until the 1st of May 2011. Buy tickets for the exhibition on VisitLondon’s website or go to www.titaniclondon.co.uk for further information.

Get there
Take the Jubilee line to North Greenwich and walk 200m from the underground station to the 02. For directions, find the O2 on our Britain Map. For Oyster Cards and other transport tickets, visit our online shop.

For more information about transport or other events at the O2, please visit www.theo2.co.uk.

/Towe

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The Land of Exotic Animal Crossings?

Fun fact. Working with British as a second language, you often learn new words when translating texts or exploring topics to write about for the blog or the homepage. One of those words I happened to come across at some point is the peculiar word pelican crossing. What is it, I asked myself and started searching the net for advice. A pelican crossing is a type of pedestrian crossing with traffic lights and a push button with two coloured lamps.

But if you think that’s a funny name for it, you should continue reading, because the big white bird is not the only exotic animal that named a crossing in Britain. Listen to this – In the UK you can find a Zebra crossing (the most common type of crossing, usually without control signals), a panda crossing (signal-controlled crossing which was only in use during the 60s), a puffin crossing (signal-controlled crossing with sensors), a tiger crossing (crossing painted black and yellow with middle field for bicycles), a toucan crossing (crossing for pedestrians and bicycles) and last but not least a Pegasus crossing (for pedestrians, bicycles and horses). Ok, I admit, Pegasus is not an exotic animal; it’s more of a fantasy creature. But the Brits chose to name a crossing after it anyway so I guess it qualifies. And I think it’s quite a cute way to make something fun out of something as boring as pedestrian crossings. Don’t you think?

– Towe

Source: Wikipedia

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Poll: What is most important when choosing a destination?

We are always curious to find out what triggers people to go to Britain. Are you keener to choose a destination because of the price or is the destination itself more important, regardless what it costs? Maybe you don’t like cold weather or prefer hotels with high standard? Reasons for choosing a specific destination are very personal,  so the question for this Poll of the Month is:

What is most important when choosing a vacation destination?

To vote, click on your preferred choice in the right-hand menu and then press [vote].

 

Which category did you want us to write more about?

Last month we wanted to find out what you readers thought we should write more about and there were three topics that stood out from the rest:

Attractions & Culture               25 %
Nature & heritage                      16 %
Food & Drink                               15 %

So thank you all for voting, we will try to accommodate your wishes in the coming blog posts.

– Towe

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Vintage Cars at Historic Car Run

On Sunday it is time for the 77th running of the world famous London to Brighton Veteran Car Run (LBVCR).

The first run was held in 1896 and is the oldest still running motoring event. The next run was held in 1927 as a re-enactment of the 1896 Run and after that the run has been held every November, with exception for the year 1947 (because of the petrol rationing) and the war years. The run is not a race, but an endurance event and as the name suggests it goes along the 60 mile long historic route from London to Brighton.

This year 567 vehicles, representing 23 nations from all over the world participate in the run. The run features 166 different marques, covering one of the most important periods of motor car development, from the 2 cylinder 2 h.p. 1895 Peugeot to the 4 cylinder 20 h.p. 1904 Renault.

The run starts at the Hyde Park Start line in London at 7.04pm on Sunday the 7th of November and then leave in pairs until approximately 8.40am. All vehicles travel at approximately 20mph (32km/h) and will start to arrive at Preston Park in Brighton from 10.05am (see detailed entry list on LBVCR’s website). The spectating of the run is free and can be viewed from the roadside along the 60-mile route.

Except for the run on Sunday, the whole weekend is full of activities, starting on Friday the 5th of November with LBVCR Auction by Bonhams and continues with the LBVCR International Concours on Saturday. So find your binoculars and prepare for a weekend full of beautiful veteran cars.

Find your way to the start line in London or the finish line in Brighton on our Britain Map or read more about the run on LBVCR’s website: http://www.lbvcr.com.

Enjoy!
– Towe

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Aberdeen – friendly and tasty

Remember the competition we had together with VisitScotland last year for our Norwegian bloggers? The two lucky winners Asbjørn Wille and Liv Brekkenes won a 3 day trip to Aberdeen City and Shire. A couple of weeks ago, we posted Asbjørns trip to Aberdeen and now it’s Livs turn. She brought her friend Mona Myhran along and here’s their story.

“Aberdeen is mainly known for its agriculture and oil industry, and not exactly for being a typical tourist destination. It was therefore quite a surprise to discover that this city has a lot to offer. You just have to give it a chance.

What impressed us most were the friendly and welcoming people we met everywhere, and the beautiful and stunning architecture. The churches and cathedrals were magnificent, and the small brick houses with the pipes on the outside walls and the chimneys on the roofs are really something else from our houses in Norway.

We had a great Indian meal in Cinnamon restaurant on Union Street and some tasty whiskys in the Grill Bar, also on Union Street. Unfortunately we didn’t have time to visit the city beach nor the Maritime Museum. That’s on the list for our next visit!

Stonehaven – Lush and green

Our first stop driving south of Aberdeen was Stonehaven. Famous for being the birth city of Robert William Thomson who invented the rubber pneumatic tyre, the little fossil Pneumodesmus Newmani and an art deco swimming pool. An outdoor swimming pool in Scotland may seem bizarre, but it is heated to 27 degrees and was great.  We visited in rain and beside the impressive design, watching the safety guard under her umbrella made us remember that we actually were in Scotland.

Fortunately the weather changes quickly, and walking at the beach in sunshine is fantastic. Surrounded by green, steep cliffs, blue ocean and gardens filled up with colourful flowers. The lush and green landscape was one of the things that amazed us, but as one of the locals we talked to said, with typical Scottish humour – the only positive outcome of all the rain.

Spectacular view

We also recommend a visit to Dunnottar Castle. It’s a really impressive ruined fortress with a great historical story. The history tells that this has been the hiding place for the Scottish crown jewels after they had been smuggled out from Edinburgh when the English invaded. The crown jewels are back in Edinburgh, but the remains of the castle is well worth the visit.  The view is spectacular and with a location on a cliff 50m above the sea, it is obvious that the fortress has been difficult to access. The castle has a story going back to 400’s and with more than 1300 years of history it is one of the most fascinating castles in Scotland. Dunnottar Castle was also the setting for the movie Hamlet from the 1990’s, starring Mel Gibson.

For visitors information and opening hours, please visit www.dunnottarcastle.co.uk

Our wonderful days in Scotland were finally set in Edinburgh where we enjoyed the Edinburgh Castle, the Modern Museum and the last day of the annual International Festival. Theatre groups, musicians and artists from all over the world filled the streets with their performances. It was a lovely atmosphere.

Want to visit the places Liv and Mona went to? Check out the links below to find them on our Britain Map:
Stonehaven
Dunnottar Castle
The Cinnamon restaurant
The Grill bar
Edinburgh Castle

/Towe

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It’s all about jazz at London Jazz Festival

For the 18th year in a row, the London Jazz festival is back for another year of amazing live performances and guest appearances by musicians from all over the world. Jazz lovers will be able to enjoy concerts from brassy big bands acts to intimate solo performances.

The festival has been known to bring the world’s best contemporary jazz artists to London and this year is no exception. Veteran saxophonist Sonny Rollins will be celebrating his 80th birthday with a concert at the festival and other concerts this year will include flamenco guitarist Paco de Lucía, Esperanza Spalding, Brad Mehldau and Joshua Redman, Paolo Conte, Marital Solal and much more. For us Scandinavians, who would like to see some fellow countrymen perform, the festival has 3 Danish and 6 Norwegian acts visiting this year.

A must see if you’re into vocals, is Guy Barkers opening concert at the Barbican – Jazz Voice: Celebrating a Century of song. In this act a wide range of vocal stars from the worlds of jazz, rock and soul will be showcasing a programme of songs, films, singers and songwriters down the decades.

The London Jazz Festival takes place Friday 12 – Sunday 21 November 2010 at several venues around London. Tickets range in price, but if you want to go I suggest you hurry. Some concerts are already sold out. For further information and booking, please visit www.londonjazzfestival.org.uk.

If you can’t make it to the festival, View London has put together some great lists of jazz clubs and jazz bars in London for you to check out.

– Towe

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